Lunar eclipse moon gets DISTORTED in apocalyptic shapes just before plunging into the ocean – And other amazing eclipse pictures

A partial lunar eclipse occurred on 19 November 2021. This was the longest partial lunar eclipse since 1440, and the longest until 2669.

The fullest extent of lunar eclipse was visible over North and South America after midnight on Friday, with the event beginning in the latest hours of Thursday night over parts of Alaska and Hawaii.

The lunar eclipse moon is not round anymore. Picture by Óscar Martín Mesonero
The lunar eclipse moon is not round anymore. Picture by Óscar Martín Mesonero

Northern and western Europe and the westernmost parts of Africa were only able to enjoy the first phase of the eclipse, as the moon rapidly set below the horizon on the morning of Friday, 19 November 2021.

On the other hand, it was a great place to see the lunar eclipse mirage. I have never seen something similar in my life!

Lunar eclipse mirage photographed by Oscar Martín Mesonero from Muxía, Spain
Lunar eclipse mirage photographed by Oscar Martín Mesonero from Muxía, Spain

We could only see the lunar eclipse for a few minutes before sunrise,” says Mesonero, “but what an amazing few minutes it was. The Moon was stretched into fantastic shapes just before it sank into the waves of the Atlantic.

This is an inferior mirage. It’s caused by layers of relatively warm air just above the sea surface. These layers refract and bend the lunar disk. As the real Moon sinks down toward the horizon, an inverted image of the Moon pops up out of the waves. Mesonero caught them meeting in the middle.

Take a closer look at the above image. It shows mirrored craters on either side of the meeting point. The lower image of the Moon is called the “inferior” image – hence “inferior mirage.”

A face is looking down at us!

VK Picture
VK Picture

Below you will find some other amazing but more normal pictures of the November 2021’s partial lunar eclipse.