Jharia India: The City of Hell Built Over a Giant Burning Pit

This is hell city!

Jharia sits over a huge underground fire that has burned for 100 years. And sometimes, huge burning craters open up and swallow everything above them.

In the city of Jharia and surroundings, an underground fire has been burning since 1916 – or even longer according to the locals. The fire probably started when abandon coalmines was not properly closed. The fire evolved in to more than 70 underground fires. The inhabitants use the fire to warm themselves on cold winter nights, to dry clothes and sometimes even cook food. Here a whole mountain is lit up by the underground fires.

Eternal fires are burning just below the earth’s surface in Jharia, India, slowly consuming a vast store of coal and occasionally opening immense chasms that swallow everything above them.

This terrible situation documented in amazing pictures by Johnny Haglund reminds me of the everlasting fires in the USA as well as the door to hell in the desert of Turkmenistan.

In Jharia, India, the underground coal has been burning for more than 80 years – some say more than 100 years – and it is still burning. Actually, it has never been worse than now. The earth is literary on fire. Whole mountains are burning, houses disappear and people are dying.

The fires started in 1916 and are the result of coal mines that were improperly shut down.

Today, some 70 fires are currently burning.

Twenty years ago, the earth opened and destroyed 250 houses in just two hours. Over time the flames have chewed through 41 million tons of the coal.

In the city of Jharia and surroundings, an underground fire has been burning since 1916 – or even longer according to the locals. The fire probably started when abandon coalmines was not properly closed. The fire evolved in to more than 70 underground fires. The inhabitants use the fire to warm themselves on cold winter nights, to dry clothes and sometimes even cook food.

People live amongst smoke and toxic fumes that constantly seep out of the earth, causing respiratory and skin problems.

Residents’ faces are burning and covered by a layer of coal. The soles of boots are meting off.

In the city of Jharia and surroundings, an underground fire has been burning since 1916 – or even longer according to the locals. The fire probably started when abandon coalmines was not properly closed. The fire evolved in to more than 70 underground fires. The inhabitants use the fire to warm themselves on cold winter nights, to dry clothes and sometimes even cook food.

Some people steal coal from the mines, selling it in local markets or using it for cooking and heating.

Though they might go unnoticed by authorities, these individuals often are injured or killed falling into fissures.

Underground fires are notoriously difficult to put out. Some experts say Jharia has enough coal to burn for another 3,800 years. Fires can be extinguished by sand, water, or cutting off the oxygen supply.