A Serpent like Dragon Mexican folk-art sculptures on display around Rockefeller Center

And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.

Revelation 12:9

Rockefeller Center last week kicked off a nearly two-week celebration of Mexican culture and Día de Los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, with the installation of larger-than-life Mexican folk-art sculptures and other artworks around the plaza. As part of the campus-wide commemoration, see an 11-foot dragon and a 13.5-foot feathered jaguar, an exhibition of fashionably dressed skeleton figures, a Día de Los Muertos display altar, and a floral installation adorning the center’s iconic bronze statue Atlas.

As part of a partnership between the Consulate General of Mexico in New York, the Mexican Cultural Institute, and Rockefeller Center, “Mexico Week” started last Friday with the unveiling of the sculptures and skeleton figures.

The two alebrijes, which are brightly colored sculptures depicting fantastical creatures, were created by artist Ricardo Angeles of Oaxaca’s Atelier Jacobo and Maria Angeles.

Designed by Menchaca Studio, Arte Wixárika, the catrinas are elegant, colorful skeleton figures, considered the most recognizable symbol of modern Day of the Dead celebrations.
Designed by Menchaca Studio, Arte Wixárika, the catrinas are elegant, colorful skeleton figures, considered the most recognizable symbol of modern Day of the Dead celebrations.
Designed by Menchaca Studio, Arte Wixárika, the catrinas are elegant, colorful skeleton figures, considered the most recognizable symbol of modern Day of the Dead celebrations.
Designed by Menchaca Studio, Arte Wixárika, the catrinas are elegant, colorful skeleton figures, considered the most recognizable symbol of modern Day of the Dead celebrations.